OldRacingCars.com

McLaren M16C car-by-car histories

Johnny Rutherford's 1974 short track McLaren M16C, identifiable from its black roll hoop, seen here at Milwaukee. Copyright Glenn Snyder  2014. Used with permission.

Johnny Rutherford's 1974 short track McLaren M16C, identifiable from its black roll hoop, seen here at Milwaukee. Copyright Glenn Snyder 2014. Used with permission.

The McLaren M16C was the most successful of the M16 variants, with works driver Johnny Rutherford winning eight races in M16Cs, including both the Indianapolis 500 and the Pocono 500 in 1974.

After the M16-series cars had won three of the six 500-mile races held since their debut, the basic design was refined further for 1973 with the M16C, distinguished by a slimmer headrest fairing and a slightly lower and wider monocoque. The five fuel cells of the M16B were reduced to four, allowing for a five-gallon oil compartment in the left side of the monocoque, and the monocoque ended behind the driver's seat with the Offy mounted as a stressed member. Suspension geometry was unchanged from the original M16 and transmission was via a Hewland LG Mark 2 gearbox.

Note that numbers of races is very sketchy as we do not (yet) know exactly how backup cars were used as short track cars. The Team McLaren backup in 1974 and 1975 has been identified, and good progress has been made for Penske Racing, but the details of Salt Walther's cars are still being worked through.  All the cars have small detail differences that allow them to be identified, but finding photographs from every singe race is a challenge.

If you can add anything to these histories, please contact Allen Brown (allen@oldracingcars.com).

Chassis
History
Current owner
McLaren M16C-1
The Harrah Collection's McLaren M16C, on display at the National Automobile Museum in Reno, NV, in May 2014. Licenced by Rahul Nair under Creative Commons licence Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic. Original image has been cropped.

The Harrah Collection's McLaren M16C, on display at the National Automobile Museum in Reno, NV, in May 2014. Licenced by Rahul Nair under Creative Commons licence Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic. Original image has been cropped.

New to Roger Penske for Bobby Allison to drive at the 1973 Indy 500 as the #12 Sunoco DX car. Sold to Roy Woods and appeared at Ontario in August/September 1973 as the #74 Carling entry for John Mahler, who crashed it in the race. It evidently returned to Penske and was rebuilt as the #8 entry for Gary Bettenhausen in 1974. Used by Mike Hiss after Bettenhausen was injured in a dirt race in July 1974. Taken over by Tom Sneva in 1975 as the #68 Norton Spirit entry but wrecked in Sneva's huge accident at Indy in 1975. Rebuilt later in the season and rejoined the team to be Sneva's short-track car in 1976. History then unknown until 2009 when it was part of the Harrah Collection at the National Automobile Museum (Reno, NV). Presumably it had been bought by Bill Harrah, founder of Harrah's Casinos. After his death in November 1978 the Harrah’s Automobile Collection was acquired by Holiday Inns and started to be broken up and auctions in the mid-1980s. In response to ensuing outcry, Holiday Inns agreed to donate 175 cars and Harrah's research library to a new Harrah Automobile Foundation and this became the basis of the National Automobile Museum which opened in Reno, Nevada, in 1989. The car is in Sneva's 1977 red, white and blue Norton/Gould/CAM2 livery, suggesting it was used as a show car in 1977. Still in the museum in September 2018.

Driven by: Bobby Allison, John Mahler, Gary Bettenhausen, Mike Hiss and Tom Sneva. First race: Indianapolis Motor Speedway (R4), 30 May 1973. Total of 19 recorded races.

Harrah Collection at the National Automobile Museum (USA) 2018
McLaren M16C-2
The McLaren M16C when owned by Ron Rickard. Copyright Duncan Fox  2010. Used with permission.

The McLaren M16C when owned by Ron Rickard. Copyright Duncan Fox 2010. Used with permission.

Aaron Lewis's McLaren M16C at the Historic Indycar Exhibition in 2017. Copyright Ian Blackwell  2017. Used with permission.

Aaron Lewis's McLaren M16C at the Historic Indycar Exhibition in 2017. Copyright Ian Blackwell 2017. Used with permission.

New for McLaren Cars at the start of 1973, and raced by Johnny Rutherford at the early short-track events. Probably used by him at short track events later in the year. Also driven by Peter Revson as the #15 Gulf entry at Pocono and Ontario in 1973. To George Walther for Salt Walther to drive at the Indy 500 in 1974 as the #77 Dayton Walther Spl, but Walther then acquired M16C/6, retaining M16C/2 as his #33 spare car at the Indy 500 in 1975 and 1976. It was raced by Bob Harkey at Indy 1975 and by David Hobbs at Indy in 1976. How it was used during the rest of the 1975 and 1976 season is unclear but it was quite possibly used as a short-track car. Relegated to the team's third car for 1977 when Walther acquired M16C/5 from McLaren. Sold with M16C/6 to Jerry Karl/William R. Compton Sr for 1978, converted to Chevrolet V8 power and entered by Tonco Trailer until 1981 but its exact usage is unclear. Sold to Chuck Haines (St Louis, MO) but had moved to Ron Rickard (San Diego, CA) by 1986 when he drove it at the Palm Springs historics. Sold to Tony Roberts and Duncan Fox (Auckland, New Zealand) in 1997 and used in historics with an aluminium 355 ci Chevrolet V8 from 1998 to 2000. Sold to the Mathews Collection still with its Chevrolet engine. From Mathews to Aaron Lewis (Australia) in 2009. Displayed by Lewis at the Historic Indycar Exhibition in 2017 and 2018. Sold to American collector John Stafford III in October 2018.

Driven by: Johnny Rutherford, Peter Revson, David "Salt" Walther, Larry McCoy, Bob Harkey, David Hobbs and Jerry Karl. First race: Texas World Speedway (R1), 7 Apr 1973. Total of 18 recorded races.

John Stafford III (USA) 2019
McLaren M16C-3
Mario Andretti in the Penske-owned CAM2 McLaren M16C at the 1976 Indy 500. Copyright Glenn Snyder  2014. Used with permission.

Mario Andretti in the Penske-owned CAM2 McLaren M16C at the 1976 Indy 500. Copyright Glenn Snyder 2014. Used with permission.

To Roger Penske for Gary Bettenhausen to drive during the 1973 season as the #5 Sunoco DX car, and used by him at all races that season. Entered for Mike Hiss as the #68 Norton Spirit entry at Indianapolis and Michigan in 1974. Then the #16 CAM2 Motor Oil entry for Bobby Allison at four long-track races in 1975. Then raced by Mario Andretti for Penske as the #6 in 1976 at the Indy 500 and Pocono. Sold to Bill Simpson later in 1976 (still as #6) together with M16C/4. It then became part of Teddy Yip's Theodore Racing team in 1977 as their #39 but was crashed very heavily by Clay Regazzoni in Indy practice. The wrecked car was cubed by Yip.

Driven by: Gary Bettenhausen, Mike Hiss, Bobby Allison, Mario Andretti, Bill Simpson, Alan Jones, Steve Krisiloff and Gianclaudio "Clay" Regazzoni. First race: Trenton International Speedway (R3), 15 Apr 1973. Total of 26 recorded races.

Cubed 1977
McLaren M16C-4
Tom Sneva in Penske Racing's #68 Norton Spirit McLaren M16C at Milwaukee in 1976. Copyright Glenn Snyder  2014. Used with permission.

Tom Sneva in Penske Racing's #68 Norton Spirit McLaren M16C at Milwaukee in 1976. Copyright Glenn Snyder 2014. Used with permission.

The history of this car in 1973 and 1974 remains unproven, but believed to be new for Peter Revson as McLaren Cars' #15 entry at the 1973 Indy 500. Crashed by Revson and it is unclear when the car returned to the team. Almost certainly Johnny Rutherford's black rollhooped short track car in 1974. McLaren records show that M16C/4 was sold to Roger Penske in November 1974. Raced by Tom Sneva in 1975 as the #68 Norton Spirit entry after his original M16C was wrecked at the Indy 500. Used again by Sneva as the #68 on long tracks in 1976, and presumably the #68 driven by Mario Andretti in two late-season races. Sold to Bill Simpson with M16C/3 and became part of Teddy Yip's Theodore Racing team in 1977 as their #38 car, raced by Clay Regazzoni at the Indy 500 and by Rick Mears later in the season. Unknown in 1978 but reappeared in 1979 as Bill Alsup's #41 WASP Racing car. Raced by Phil Caliva for Alsup Racing in 1980 as the #47 and at Indy 1981 where it was "extensively damaged" on 12 May in an accident during practice. Not seen again.

Driven by: Peter Revson, Johnny Rutherford, Tom Sneva, Mario Andretti, Bill Simpson, Gianclaudio "Clay" Regazzoni, Rick Mears, Bill Alsup and Phil Caliva. First race: Indianapolis Motor Speedway (R4), 30 May 1973. Total of 48 recorded races.

Wrecked 1981
McLaren M16C-5
The 1974 Indy 500 winning McLaren M16C on display at Indianapolis in 2016. Copyright Ian Blackwell  2016. Used with permission.

The 1974 Indy 500 winning McLaren M16C on display at Indianapolis in 2016. Copyright Ian Blackwell 2016. Used with permission.

New for McLaren Cars to be driven by Johnny Rutherford as the #7 Gulf entry in 1973. He used this car at the Indy 500 but may have used M16C/2 (or even M16C/4) at other races that season. Raced again by Rutherford in 1974 as the #3 car, winning the Indy 500, but he used another M16C at short track events that year. This car then became Rutherford's short-track car in 1975 and 1976. Sold to George Walther to be Salt Walther #33 backup car at Indy in 1977 but how it was used that season is unknown. Entered by Walther at the 1978 Indy 500 as the #34 for Graham McRae but he was bumped. Sold by Walther to Rick Carroll (Jensen Beach, FL) and restored. Sold by Carroll's estate in 1990 via Sotherby's Palm Springs Auction for $495,000 to Patrick S. Ryan (Montgomery, AL). Loaned by Ryan to the IMS Museum but also attended various concours events while owned by Ryan. Repainted by Paintergeek Paintworks (Indianapolis, IN) in May 2013. Sold by Ryan through RM Auctions at Monterey in August 2013 for $3,250,000 to web entrepreneur Bill Oesterle (Indianapolis, IN). On display at the Historic Indycar Exhibition in May 2016. In 2018, the car was acquired by McLaren, and in March 2018, it was put on display at the McLaren Technology Centre.

Driven by: Johnny Rutherford, David "Salt" Walther and Graham McRae. First race: Trenton International Speedway (R2), 15 Apr 1973. Total of 34 recorded races.

McLaren Racing Limited (UK) 2019
McLaren M16C-6
Chuck Haines' recently restored Carling Black Label McLaren M16C at Indianapolis in 2016. Copyright Ian Blackwell  2016. Used with permission.

Chuck Haines' recently restored Carling Black Label McLaren M16C at Indianapolis in 2016. Copyright Ian Blackwell 2016. Used with permission.

New in 1974 for McLaren Cars as a M16C/D for David Hobbs to drive at the 1974 Indy 500 as the #73 Carling Black Label entry. Sold to George Walther by early July for Salt Walther to drive and used as his main #77 car at the Indy 500 in 1975, 1976 and 1977. Walther had other McLarens during this time and he is likely to have used those on short tracks. Sold with M16C/2 to Jerry Karl for 1978 and entered as his #88 Offy car with Frank Fiore as chief mechanic and a #89 RasCar/Atlanta as his backup. How this car was used later is currently unclear. Sold with M16C/2 to Chuck Haines (St Louis, MO) and stored for some years, before undergoing a complete restoration in 2015. Appeared at the Historic Indycar Exhibition in May 2016 in immaculate Carling livery. To Rob Dyson (Millbrook, NY) of Dyson Racing c2017. Entered in the the Amelia Island Concours March 2018, winning the Hulman Memorial Award for Best Race Car.

Driven by: David Hobbs, David "Salt" Walther and Jerry Karl. First race: Indianapolis Motor Speedway (R6), 26 May 1974. Total of 49 recorded races.

Rob Dyson (USA) 2019

This history is a result of the collaborative research of Allen Brown and Simmo Iskül, with additional information from Michael Ferner, restorer Duncan Fox, owners Aaron Lewis and Chuck Haines, and researchers 'gbl', Luis Mateus, Tom Schultz and Gerry Measures. Thanks also to Glenn Snyder and Ian Blackwell for their photographs.

These histories last updated on .